Do You Have Information on the 109th New York Volunteers During the Civil War?

by Brett Schulte on June 17, 2010 · 21 comments

TOCWOC – A Civil War Blog reader Mary Jordan contacted me recently about reaching out to others interested in the 109th New York Volunteers during the Civil War.  She writes:

In the process of publishing a book Dear Friend Amelia: The Civil War Love letters of Private John Tidd. In 2011, hope to have ready for publication The 109th NYV Remembered to include letters, diaries, and updated adjutant.  Anyone having any information of the 109th, willing to share with me…[phone number and email address redacted for privacy reasons].

If you have any information on the 109th New York or if you have an ancestor who served in the regiment, please leave a comment after this blog entry and I’ll put you in touch with Mary.


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{ 21 comments… read them below or add one }

George Skoch June 18, 2010 at 9:35 am

Greetings,

While I’m sorry to say that I am unable to add information about the 109th NYV, I would be privileged if Ms. Jordan would consider me to do any maps or graphics she may need for her upcoming book. Please feel free to give her my contact information. I will gladly answer any questions she may have, and supply samples of my work.

I am grateful for your consideration.

Sincerely,

George Skoch

4104 W. 229th Street, Fairview Park, OH 44126

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Jim F. June 18, 2010 at 2:21 pm

The New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center website has good capsule histories of NYS units in the Civil War. Here’s the info for the 109th: http://dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/109thInf/109thInfMain.htm
The museum itself is located in Saratoga Springs, NY–cool place to visit if you have the chance.

-Jim F.

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Will Hickox June 19, 2010 at 4:33 am

The Gail and Stephen Rudin Collection of Civil War Letters at Cornell University has at least one letter from a 109th NY soldier. It’s in box 2, folder 24.

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Mary Jordan June 19, 2010 at 5:25 am

Hi, Thanks for the replys to my blog. “Dear Friend Amelia” Tje Civil War Love Letters of Private John Tidd” will be going to print in late July. This is John Tidd’s experiences in the Civil War while a member of the 109th. The narrative is based on 48 letters written to Amelia Haskell of Speedsville, New York with history and historical photographs of Speedsville and of the war. The cost of this book is $34.95 plus tax and shipping and handling.

Our book (Mary Jordan & Joyce Hatch) is a history of the 109th. This book contains letters and diaries of 21 soldiers, 150 plus pictures of the soldiers of the 109th and an updated adjutant with added information as to the soldiers life before and after the war; several bios of the soldiers and more. Any additional information on this unit would be greatly appreciated.

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Greg Walpole December 10, 2010 at 11:23 am

Hi Mary,

My GG Grandfather was in company F of the 109th from August 1862 until being wounded at Spotsylvania on the 12th of May 1864. I have roughly 60 letters from him to various members of his family I would be willing to share, as well as the orignal muster paper of Company F.

Please feel free to contact me at the email provided.

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Mary Jordan January 27, 2011 at 7:00 pm

The above website is for my new book Dear Friend Amelia: The Civil War Letters of Private John Tidd. My sister and I are in the process of writing the life history and publishing the diary of Alexander Patten, A Regimental History of the 109th and The 109th Remembered. We are always looking for any information on the soldiers of the 109th.
Thank you for your interest.

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Fran June 1, 2017 at 11:31 am

Hi Mary,
My great great grandfather, Jefferson Sliter served in the 109th. I have several pages of a diary that I would be happy to share. He talks about each battle in detail. My email is fmr61@codelock.com
Fran Microulis

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Francis Porter February 6, 2011 at 8:47 pm

My gr grandfather, Michael E. Van Ostrand, served in the 109th infantry. He was a member of the G.A.R. in Tompkins County, NY. He had a brother who served with the 137th infantry. I am in the process of obtaining their military records. They both servived the war.

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Mary Jordan February 7, 2011 at 3:01 am

Hi Francis, Thank you so much for your reply. The only information tht I have on Michael Van ostran d is from the minutes of the 109th NY Vol. Annual Reunion 1928, recorded by Henry Fowler. “Died between within past year”

Do you have access to ancestry.com? My sister Joyce and I are in the process of tracing down in formation on each soldier. Please, let us know if you find out any information and we will do the same. There were several Vanostrands in the adjutant. Andrew (Co. K), Greg, (Co. K), Pitney J. (Co. I). Do you know if they were related?

If Michael receivied a pension, there is usually quite alot of information regarding the soldier and their family in the records. Do you have a picture of Michael.

Our great great grandfather was also in the 137th.

Thanks so much for contacting me.

Mary

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Fran March 7, 2012 at 2:27 pm

My great grandfather, Jefferson B. Sliter, served in the 109th NY, Company I. I have some diary pages from the Battle of the Crater and other battles.

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Karan A. Vice May 19, 2012 at 2:41 pm

I am writting up a publicity notice re: a Memorial Day week-end event honoring Civil War soldiers and Henry Fowler of the 109th NY Volunteers name came up. His 1903 speech, is being re-created. This is the first blog I located that has further information about this gentelman. It is inspiring that today, some 109 years later, the love for his nation burns bright enought to reach us today. This man was wounded in the right thigh in front of Petersburgh, and lived to tell all, how grateful he was to be a citizen of the United States “representing all united into one grand, magnificent, harmonious whole” I want to learn more about this patriot- Karan

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M. E. Colella January 8, 2013 at 11:51 am

What did you want to know about Henry L. Fowler? I saw him in 1938.

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Richard Britton July 14, 2012 at 8:39 am

My great great grandfather served in the 109th, Company C. His name was Edward Royal Richardson. He was a private. Was captured in a field hospital by reb general Chalmers and returned in a prisoner exchange. I have copies of some paperwork from Washington regarding a request to increase his pension in his old age that gives this and a little more info.

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Ken Skrivseth January 2, 2013 at 10:00 pm

The 109th spent time guarding the Washington Branch of the B&O Railroad in Annapolis Junction, Laurel, and Beltsville MD for more than a year. This rail line was essential to the Union because it transported northern troops and supplies to Washington DC and to the eastern battlefields. It is estimated that 800,000 troops passed through this ONLY rail connection from the north to Washington DC. If you have letters from any of the locations above between 1862 and 1863, transcriptions would be appreciated!

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Greg Walpole October 13, 2013 at 9:17 pm

Ken, please send your contact info to me at walpole214@msn.com. I have a number of letters regarding the daily life of the 109th on rail duty at the sites mentioned in your note. I would be more than happy to provide transcripts. They were written by my gg grandfather who was a,private in Co. F during the war.

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Caryl Ruckert May 8, 2017 at 2:25 pm

Hi Greg, I am not sure if this thread is still active but in hopes that it is, I would love to read the letters that you have from the 109th duty in Laurel and Beltsville, MD. My 3rd GG William Riley White and his brother John Wesley White both served in 109th Company F. Uncle John Wesley White was killed at the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse my 3 GG survived the war. Any information that you can share is appreciated!

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Greg Walpole June 1, 2017 at 10:19 am

Caryl,

Please reach out to me directly at walpole214@msn.com. I am happy to share information providing some insight into Company F.

Greg

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Sue Thompson August 26, 2015 at 8:06 am

looking for records of chaplain 109th reg. nys 1864 marriage performed by chaplin in Maryland of the 109th reg. John Quick and Jennetta Jones.

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Karen Messersmith January 29, 2016 at 1:40 pm

Hi Mary,
Do you have any information on a Daniel Burrows in the 109th or his brother Charles also in the same 109th?
Thank-you for any information Dan is my GG Grandfather.

Karen

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Addam MacDonald June 30, 2018 at 7:33 am

Hello,

My 1st cousin (7x removed) served in the 109th. The unit was raised in Binghamton and its surrounding areas. They were also know as the Binghamton Regiment, and Railway Brigade. My relative was the commander Colonel Benjamin Franklin Tracy. He was in command until May 1864 when he was severly injured while carrying the colors, and trying to get their line fortified, and hold off the confederates. He returned to action in less than a year, and requested the same unit. However, he was given another assignment to command the 127th Infantry Colored Unit which he accepted right away. At the same time he was also placed in command of the POW camp in Elmira, New York (not sure how he was able to do both). He was discharged on August 24, 1864. In 1867 President Andrew Johnson now nominated him for Brigidier General, and was confirmed by the U.S. senate in February 1867. He was also awarded the Medal of Honor in 1895.

A couple interesting facts I recently found while doing research. When B.F. Tracy was severly wounded at the Battle of the Wilderness in 1864. His brother-in-law Isaac Catlin was promoted to command the unit, but was severly injured not long after and one of his legs was amputated.
Another interesting tidbit is B.F. Tracy was technically discharged in 1864. However, due to his work as Secretary of the Navy in the Benjamin Harrison Presidency. The Navy made his offical discharge date in June 1946 after World War II. Tracy died in 1915.

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Judith Ferryman August 30, 2019 at 1:21 pm

Private Franklin Dearman 109th regiment New York Infantry

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