Index for the Supplement to the Official Records

by Brett Schulte on September 1, 2014 · 2 comments

Several year ago I posted on Broadfoot Publishing’s hard to find set Supplement to the Official Records.  In that post, I linked to a very detailed index of the set, but when I went to click on the link recently, the site the index is on had exceeded its bandwidth.  In an effort to give this index a more permanent home, I’ve duplicated that index below.  I hope some researchers and other students of the Civil War find it useful.

Part
I: Reports

Reports
of engagements, actions, battles, maneuvers, etc.,
written by an officer to an officer.
Included are post war reports requested by
the Adjutant General, eyewitness accounts of engagements
otherwise infrequently described, and accounts supplying
substantive supplemental material, including court-martials,
courts of inquiry and proceedings.

Volume

O.R.
Vol.

O.R.
Serial No.

1

Volumes
1-10

(serial
nos. 1-10)

2

Volumes
11-12

(serial
nos. 12-13, 15-16)

3

Volumes
13-21

(serial
nos. 19-22, 24, 26-29, 31)

4

Volumes
22-26

(serial
nos. 32, 34, 36-37, 39, 41)

5

Volumes
27-30

(serial
nos. 43-44, 46, 48, 50-51)

6

Volumes
31-37

(serial
nos. 54-55, 57, 60, 61, 65, 67-68, 70)

7

cppbanner Index for the Supplement to the Official Records

Volumes
38-50

(serial
nos. 72-74, 77, 80, 83, 87, 90, 92, 93, 95, 98,
101, 103, 105)

 

Volume

Serial
No.

Contents

8

Serial
no. 8

Warren
Court of Inquiry

9

Serial
no. 9

Proceedings,
findings, and opinions of the Court of Inquiry …
in the case of Gouverneur K. Warren, part II

10

Serial
no. 10
 

Court-martial
proceedings of Lieutenant-Colonel Robert G. Morrison,
34th Indiana Veteran Volunteer Infantry (Volume
48, serial no. 101); Report of Albert James Myer,
Union Chief Signal Officer, of the Operations and
Duties of the Signal Department of the Army, 1860-1865

11

Serial
no. 11

Index,
A-L

12

Serial
no. 12

Index,
M-Z.

Part
II: Record of Events & Itineraries

Records
of Events and itineraries show troops movements and
give histories of the units.
Confederate transcriptions include the officer
rosters which usually accompanied the records. Listed
by states, alphabetically, with organizations numbered
and named, grouped by organization type.  Records of Events were transcribed from the National Archives
microfilm M594 (Union, 225 rolls) and M861 (Confederate,
74 rolls).

Volume

Serial
No.

Contents

1

Serial
no. 13

Alabama
troops (Union and Confederate)

2

Serial
no. 14

Arizona
troops (Confederate); Arkansas troops (Union and
Confederate)

3

Serial
no. 15

California
troops (Union); Colorado troops (Union); Connecticut
troops (Union, 1st-8th Regiments)

4

Serial
no. 16

Connecticut
troops (Union, 9th-28th Regiments); Dakota troops
(Union); Delaware troops (Union)

5

Serial
no. 17

District
of Columbia troops (Union); Florida troops (Union
and Confederate); Georgia troops (Union and Confederate,
Calvary and Artillery)

6

Serial
no. 18

Georgia
troops (Confederate Infantry 1st-46th regiments)

7

Serial
no. 19

Georgia
troops (Confederate Infantry 47th-misc. units);
Illinois troops (Union Cavalry 1st-9th)

8

Serial
no. 20

Illinois
troops (Union Cavalry 10th-Misc., Artillery, Infantry
7th-12th)

9

Serial
no. 21

Illinois
troops (Union Infantry 13th-24th)

10

Serial
no. 22

Illinois
troops (Union Infantry 25th-37th)

11

Serial
no. 23

Illinois
troops (Union Infantry 38th-49th)

12

Serial
no. 24

Illinois
troops (Union Infantry 50th-60th)

13

Serial
no. 25

Illinois
troops (Union Infantry 73rd-100th)

14

Serial
no. 26

Illinois
troops (Union Infantry 101st-134th)

15

Serial
no. 27

Illinois
troops (Union Infantry 135th-156th, Misc.); Indiana
troops (Union Cavalry 1st-13th, Misc.; Artillery
1st-Misc.; Infantry 6th-8th)

16

Serial
no. 28

Indiana
troops (Union Infantry 9th-32nd)

17

Serial
no. 29

Indiana
troops (Union Infantry 33rd-68th

18

Serial
no. 30

Indiana
troops (Union Infantry 69th-Misc.)

19

Serial
no. 31

Iowa
troops (Union Cavalry 1st-9th; Artillery 1st-Misc.;
Infantry 1st-9th)

20

Serial
no. 32

Iowa
troops (Union Infantry 10th-33rd)

21

Serial
no. 33

Iowa
troops (Union Infantry 34th-48th); Kansas troops
(Union Cavalry 2nd-16th; Artillery; Infantry); Kentucky
troops (Union Cavalry 1st-11th)

22

Serial
no. 34

Kentucky
troops (Union Cavalry 12th-Misc.; Artillery; Infantry
1st-Misc.)

23

Serial
no. 35

Kentucky
troops (Confederate Cavalry 1st-Misc.; Artillery;
Infantry 1st-9th); Louisiana troops (Union Cavalry
1st-Misc.; Infantry 1st-2nd); Louisiana troops (Confederate
Cavalry 1st-Misc.; Artillery; Infantry 1st-4th)

24

Serial
no. 36

Louisiana
troops (Confederate Infantry 5th-Misc.)

25

Serial
no. 37

Maine
troops (Union Cavalry 1st-2nd; Artillery; Infantry
1st-27th)

26

Serial
no. 38

Maine
troops (Union Infantry 28th-Misc.); Maryland troops
(Union Cavalry 1st-Misc.; Artillery 1st-Misc.; Infantry
1st-Misc.)

27

Serial
no. 39

Maryland
troops (Confederate Cavalry; Artillery; Infantry);
Massachusetts troops (Union Cavalry; Artillery,
Heavy; Artillery, Light; Infantry 1st-11th)

28

Serial
no. 40

Massachusetts
troops (Infantry 10th-30th)

29

Serial
no. 41

Massachusetts
troops (Infantry 31st-Misc.); Michigan troops (Union
Cavalry 1st-4th)

30

Serial
no. 42

Michigan
troops (Union Cavalry 5th-Misc.; Artillery; Engineers
and Mechanics; Sharpshooters; Infantry 1st-9th)

31

Serial
no. 43

Michigan
troops (Union Infantry 10th-Misc.); Minnesota troops
(Union Cavalry; Artillery; Infantry 1st-4th)

32

Serial
no. 44

Minnesota
troops (Union Infantry 5th-11th); Mississippi troops
(Union Infantry); Mississippi troops (Confederate
Cavalry; Artillery; Infantry 1st-3rd)

33

Serial
no. 45

Mississippi
troops (Confederate Infantry 4th-30th)

34

Serial
no. 46

Mississippi
troops (Confederate Infantry 31st-Independent);
Missouri troops (Union Cavalry 1st-4th)

35

Serial
no. 47

Missouri
troops (Union Cavalry 4th State Militia-Misc.)

36

Serial
no. 48

Missouri
troops (Union Artillery; Engineers; Infantry)

37

Serial
no. 49

Missouri
troops (Union Infantry 12th-40th)

38

Serial
no. 50

Missouri
troops (Union Infantry 41st-Misc.); Missouri troops
(Confederate Cavalry 1st-Misc.; Artillery; Infantry
1st-Misc.); Nebraska troops (Union Cavalry 1st-1st
Battalion)

39

Serial
no. 51

Nebraska
troops (Union Cavalry 2nd-Misc.); Nevada troops
(Union Cavalry 1st Battalion; Infantry 1st Battalion);
New Hampshire troops (Union Cavalry 1st; Artillery
1st Heavy; Infantry 1st-18th, Misc.); New Jersey
troops (Union Cavalry 1st-3rd, Van Reypen’s Co.;
Artillery 1st-5th; Infantry 1st-2nd)

40

Serial
no. 52

New
Jersey troops (Union Infantry 3rd-40th)

41

Serial
no. 53

New
Mexico troops (Union Cavalry; Infantry); New York
troops (Union Cavalry; Heavy Artillery 2nd-7th)

42

Serial
no. 54

New
York troops (Union Heavy Artillery 8th-1st Marine;
Light Artillery; Infantry 1st-9th)

43

Serial
no. 55

New
York troops (Union Infantry 10th-47th State Militia)

44

Serial
no. 56

New
York troops (Union Infantry 48th-75th)

45

Serial
no. 57

New
York troops (Union Infantry 76th-102nd National
Guard)

46

Serial
no. 58

New
York troops (Union Infantry 103rd-139th)

47

Serial
no. 59

New
York troops (Union Infantry 140th-Misc.)

48

Serial
no. 60

North
Carolina troops (Union Infantry); North Carolina
troops (Confederate Cavalry; Artillery; Infantry
1st-25th)

49

Serial
no. 61

North
Carolina troops (Confederate Infantry 26th-Misc.);
Ohio troops (Union Cavalry 1st-6th)

50

Serial
no. 62

Ohio
troops (Union Cavalry 7th-Misc.; Artillery; Infantry
5th Sharpshooters-6th Reserve Militia)

51

Serial
no. 63

Ohio
troops (Union Infantry 7th-27th)

52

Serial
no. 64

Ohio
troops (Union Infantry 28th-54th)

53

Serial
no. 65

Ohio
troops (Union Infantry 55th-76th)

54

Serial
no. 66

Ohio
troops (Union Infantry 77th-103rd)

55

Serial
no. 67

Ohio
troops (Union Infantry 104th-142nd National Guard)

56

Serial
no. 68

Ohio
troops (Union Infantry 143rd National Guard-Misc.);
Oregon troops (Union Cavalry 1st; Infantry 1st);
Pennsylvania troops (Union Cavalry 1st Bttn-6th)

57

Serial
no. 69

Pennsylvania
troops (Union Cavalry 7th-Misc; Artillery 2nd Heavy)

58

Serial
no. 70

Pennsylvania
troops (Union Artillery 2nd Prov.-Misc.; Infantry
1st Res.-20th Emergency)

59

Serial
no. 71

Pennsylvania
troops (Union Infantry 21st-56th)

60

Serial
no. 72

Pennsylvania
troops (Union Infantry 57th-88th)

61

Serial
no. 73

Pennsylvania
troops (Union Infantry 90th-115th)

62

Serial
no. 74

Pennsylvania
troops (Union Infantry 116th-165th)

63

Serial
no. 75

Pennsylvania
troops (Union Infantry 166th -Misc.); Rhode Island
troops (Union Cavalry, Artillery, Infantry, Independent
Hospital Guards)

64

Serial
no. 76

South
Carolina troops (Confederate Cavalry 1st-Misc.;
Artillery; Infantry 1st-11th)

65

Serial
no. 77

South
Carolina troops (Confederate Infantry 11th Reserves-27th,
Misc.); Tennessee troops (Union Cavalry, Artillery,
Infantry)

66

Serial
no. 78

Tennessee
troops (Confederate Cavalry, Artillery, Infantry
1st-23rd)

67

Serial
no. 79

Tennessee
troops (Confederate Infantry 24th-154th, Misc.);
Texas troops (Union Cavalry); Texas troops (Confederate
Cavalry 1st-12th)

68

Serial
no. 80

Texas
troops (Confederate Cavalry 13th-37th, Misc.; Artillery;
Infantry 1st-15th)

69

Serial
no. 81

Texas
troops (Confederate Infantry 18th-Misc.); Vermont
troops (Union); Virginia troops (Union); Virginia
troops (Confederate Cavalry 1st-10th)

70

Serial
no. 82

Virginia
troops (Confederate Cavalry 11th-Misc.; Artillery;
Infantry 1st-4th)

71

Serial
no. 83

Virginia
troops (Confederate Infantry 4th Reserves-25th)

72

Serial
no. 84

Virginia
troops (Confederate Infantry 25th Battalion-64th
Militia)

73

Serial
no. 85

Virginia
troops (Confederate Militia-Misc); Confederate troops
(Cavalry; Artillery; Infantry; Indian units; Miscellaneous
units); Washington Territory troops (Union); West
Virginia troops (Union Cavalry 1st-3rd)

74

Serial
no. 86

West
Virginia troops (Union Cavalry 4th-7th; Artillery;
Infantry); Wisconsin troops (Union Cavalry 1st-4th)

75

Serial
no. 87

Wisconsin
troops (Union Artillery; Infantry 1st-14th)

76

Serial
no. 88

Wisconsin
troops (Union Infantry 15th-40th

77

Serial
no. 89

Wisconsin
troops (Union Infantry 41st-53rd; U.S. Colored troops
(Union Cavalry; Artillery; Infantry 1st-41st)

78

Serial
no. 90

U.S.
Colored troops (Union Infantry 42nd-92nd)

79

Serial
no. 91

U.S.
Colored troops (Union Infantry 93rd-Brigade Band
no. 2); U.S. Volunteers (Union); U.S. Veteran Reserve
Corps (Union 1st-14th)

80

Serial
no. 92

U.S.
Veteran Reserve Corps (Union 15th-Unassigned regiment);
Miscellaneous Units; Indian Home Guards; Mississippi
Marine Brigade; Pioneer Brigade (Army of the Cumberland).

Part
III: Correspondence

Essential
correspondence omitted from the original Official
Records.

Volume

Serial
No.

Contents

1

Serial
no. 93

Union:
April 30-December 26, 1861; Confederate: January
3-December 30, 1861; Union: January-July 28, 1962;
Confederate: January-February 28, 1862

2

Serial
no. 94

Union:
August 8-December 24, 1862; Confederate: March 1-December
29, 1862

3

Serial
no. 95

Union:
January 1-December 22, 1863; Confederate: January
1-December 19, 1963; Union: February 10-December
29, 1864; Confederate: January-December 31, 1864;
Union: January 2-June 6, 1865; Confederate: January
7-May 10, 1865.

Part
IV: Index

Includes
more than 1,000,000 entries and cross-references
for all of the Supplement materials.

Volume

Serial
No.

Contents

1-5

Serial
nos. 96-100

Index
- 5 Volumes

 

 

 

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Short Takes

by Fred Ray on August 29, 2014 · 0 comments

Most students of the Civil War have at least heard of Clement Vallandigham, an Ohio lawyer who served in Congress and stood for governor of Ohio during the Civil War. Vallandigham was a prominent Copperhead Democrat who advocated a peaceful solution to the bloodshed, and was arrested, convicted by a military court martial, and eventually exiled to the Confederacy.  It was not the finest hour of American civil liberties.

What most people will not have heard of is his rather bizarre end. Vallandigham, a lawyer, was defending a man on a murder charge in 1871. He was given the accused perp’s pistol, with three live rounds still in it, and another unloaded one, which he sat beside it. He thought about how the incident could have happened, and then:

Still flushed with the success of his tests, the lawyer began explaining to a visitor that Myers had actually shot himself, then had a sudden brainwave – he’d stage his own demonstration.

He grabbed a pistol, put it in his pocket, drew it slowly, turned the muzzle on himself and pulled the trigger.

Bang. “The unfortunate advocate had demonstrated the reasonableness of his theory,” reported the Leeds Times, “but at the cost of his life.”

Vallandigham died the next day, but his client was acquitted.

A look at the London Proof House, which is still in operation. Given a Royal Charter in 1637, its job was and is to test the strength of gun barrels. With the introduction of firearms, bursting barrels had become a real problem so the proof house was established to “prove” each one before it could be sold.  In 1813 another proof house was founded in Birmingham (then the center of the firearms trade) which is also still in operation.

The actual process of proof is drastically simple and has been so since 1637 when the company was chartered. During the era of muzzleloaders, proof consisted of loading two over charged loads, firing them into an embankment and then observing for any barrel bulges or cracks. If the barrel burst, then it obviously failed, no money back (today it costs ₤30 for a shotgun, ₤25 for a centerfire, ₤15 for a rimfire rifle or barrel to be proofed). If it passed satisfactorily it is was proof marked in a certain location. This location is dependent on the customer but is usually somewhere visible on the barrel or above the chamber. With the “Bespoke” guns the practice is to mark them on the underside of the chamber, concealed within the stock (these guns are usually listed at ₤60,000 and up and are custom made for an individual shooter). A difference between the London and Birmingham Proof Houses is that London traditionally proof marks on the right side of a gun, and Birmingham on the left.

This is still done all over the world, and if you look closely at the barrel of any rifle made in the last 200 years you will see a series of arcane marks from the proof house to certify that the barrel will hold a full charge and then some without failure.

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Some Nice Period Rifles On The Block

by Fred Ray August 21, 2014

Three very nice Civil War era rifles up for auction, but you’d better have some extra cash as I think all their estimates are rather low. Nevertheless these are fine examples of the British arms used by both sides but the more so by the Confederacy. However, none of these have any actual connection to […]

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Sheridan’s Ride…The Other One

by Brett Schulte August 11, 2014

Mention “Sheridan’s Ride” to a Civil War buff and they’ll inevitably think of Sheridan furiously riding the ten miles back to his retreating army at the Battle of Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864, rallying his army and saving the day.  It’s what I thought of when I ran across a poem entitled “Sheridan’s Ride” […]

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As I Remember: the Reminiscence of Lewis Cass White 102nd PA

by Fred Ray August 5, 2014

As I Remember: A Civil War Veteran Reflects on the War and Its Aftermath by Lewis Cass White Joseph Scopin (editor, designer), forward by Benjamin Franklin Cooling Hardcover: 184 pages Publisher: Scopin Design (2014) ISBN-10: 0615983480 ISBN-13: 978-0615983486 You never know what you’ll find in a basement or attic. That moldering pile of papers just […]

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Civil War Book Review: The Battle of Allatoona Pass: Skirmish in Bartow County, Georgia

by Brett Schulte July 28, 2014

Butkovich, Brad. The Battle of Allatoona Pass: Civil War Skirmish in Bartow County, Georgia. (The History Press: June 2014). 192 pages, illustrations, 11 maps, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN: 978-1-62619-461-8 $19.99 (Paperback). Most Civil War buffs are familiar with the bookends of John Bell Hood’s tenure as Army of Tennessee commander at Atlanta and Franklin/Nashville.  Many, […]

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Civil War Book Review: Twenty-five Hours to Tragedy: The Battle of Spring Hill by Jamie Gillum

by Brett Schulte July 21, 2014

Gillum, Jamie. Twenty-five Hours to Tragedy: The Battle of Spring Hill and Operations on November 29, 1864 Precursor to the Battle of Franklin. (Jamie Gillum, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform: 2014). 504 pages, illustrations, 42 maps, appendices, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN: 978-1-4701-0681-2 $34.16 (Paperback). To understand the disastrous Confederate result at the Battle of Franklin, you […]

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