Now they’ve banned grits and biscuits made the right way.

“We could originally serve half whole grains but that changed in 2012 when we had to start serving 100 percent whole grains,” said Stephanie Dillard, the child nutrition director for Geneva County Schools in Alabama.

That meant no more grits.

“And grits are a staple in the South,” Ms. Dillard told me. “Students really want to eat their grits.”

Statues are one thing, but grits are worth fighting for!

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The Night They Drove ‘Ol Dixie down

by Fred Ray on April 25, 2017 · 0 comments

The first of four Confederate monuments came down in New Orleans, but you have to wonder what the hey was going on. The minions of the Crescent City looked more like thieves in the night, with a very large touch of paranoia.

Workers wore bullet-proof vests, helmets and facemasks as they went about the work, which involved lifting sections of the obelisk off the statue piece by piece. The logos on their trucks and equipment was covered in cardboard and the license plates on the vehicles had been removed. One man opposed to removing the monuments told others in his group “we’ll find out who they are.”

At one point, city officials called to criticize a TV station for taking video that they said was zoomed in too close and could reveal the workers’ identities.

Wow.

For a troubled city that relies heavily in tourism and its history, this does not seem to be such great publicity.

Who’s next? Jackson?

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Check out the Siege of Petersburg Online for daily posts on battle accounts in newspaper articles, diary entries, letters and more!

What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

Want to read some interesting Civil War content from amateurs and pros alike? Check out the Top 10 Civil War Blogs and Top 10 Civil War Blogs: 11-20.

Adios “Hognose” R.I.P.

by Fred Ray April 20, 2017

I was greatly saddened to learn yesterday of the untimely demise of Kevin “Hognose” O’Brien, who ran the excellent Weaponsman blog site, a mixture of weapons lore, gun politics, and Kevin’s own unique brand of blarney. Although I never met him, Kevin and I became acquainted earlier this year when he linked to one of […]

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Another Look At Timothy Murphy

by Fred Ray April 9, 2017

If you are familiar with the Revolutionary War and especially the battle of Saratoga you’ve probably heard of Timothy Murphy. According the story, Murphy, one of Daniel Morgan’s riflemen, shot British general Simon Frazier off his horse with a double-barreled rifle at a distance of 300 yards, thereby winning the battle and perhaps even saving […]

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Origin of “Sniper”

by Fred Ray April 6, 2017

In some previous posts we’ve looked at the origin of the word “sharpshooter,” tracing it back to the early 18th Century in German and to the last part of that century in English, when it passed from German to English. But what about “sniper?” Turns out that goes back pretty far as well, although its […]

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A Confederate Whitworth

by Fred Ray March 29, 2017

Auctioneer James D. Julia has a rare Confederate Whitworth up on the block. This one even has the four power Davidson telescope. The brass tube Davidson scope was adjusted for elevation by turning the knurled knob on the right side of the forearm. This loosened the clamp on the left side so the 1-1/2″ bar […]

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Ft. Stedman Anniversary

by Fred Ray March 25, 2017

Today, March 25th, is the anniversary of the battle of Ft. Stedman, the last offensive of Lee’s Army. Civil War Trust is featuring an article I wrote a while back for America’s Civil War on the battle. By this time, of course, the battle—one of the shortest of the war—was long since over. Near Petersburg, […]

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