Inside the Henry Rifle

by Fred Ray on June 6, 2017 · 0 comments

The Henry rifle was a giant step forward in rifle technology, eventually becoming the iconic Winchester 94, which is still produced today. Some historians, like Philip Leigh, are of the opinion that its widespread adoption might have shortened the war as much as a year.

Ian at Forgotten Weapons takes a very in-depth look at the Henry and what makes it tick. If you’ve ever wondered what’s inside one, check it out.

Ian follows up with a look at the 1866 Winchester, which was a marked improvement of the Henry. He also tells why the name changed from Henry to Winchester.

At the same time that these improvements were being made, company politics were taking shape to end Benjamin T. Henry’s involvement with the company. Henry attempted to take over ownership of the company because he felt he was not profiting as much as he should, but he had assigned his patent rights to Oliver Winchester in exchange for his contract to manufacture the guns. As a result, Winchester was able to create a new company (the Winchester Repeating Arms Company) with full rights to the design patents and sideline Henry.

Winchester Lever Action Development: Model 1866

The 1866 got an upgrade a few years later, becoming the famous Winchester 73, “The Gun That Won The West.”

If for some reason this won’t play for you it’s also posted on Youtube.

{ 0 comments }


***

Check out the Siege of Petersburg Online for daily posts on battle accounts in newspaper articles, diary entries, letters and more!

What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

Want to read some interesting Civil War content from amateurs and pros alike? Check out the Top 10 Civil War Blogs and Top 10 Civil War Blogs: 11-20.

They Came for General Lee

by Fred Ray on June 2, 2017 · 1 comment

They came for General Lee, and before him General Beauregard, after which Mayor Landrieu got up and gave a long speech about what a fine fellow he was for erasing the city’s history. Seeing how the Crescent City is perennially broke, I’d be curious as to how much the removal cost, especially for police overtime, which must have been a considerable item in itself.

Baltimore is also considering the removal of its Confederate monuments. Like New Orleans, Baltimore is a city with a long list of problems, including crumbling infrastructure, riots, police scandals, corruption and much more. They seem to be at least considering the cost, although virtue-signaling seems to be more important these days.

Lee will be joined in the list of unpersons by Chief Justice Roger Taney. He was no Confederate, but wrote a judicial opinion that has since become unpopular. Even football mascots are not safe. Louisiana State University’s Tiger mascot is under fire because it, too, is somehow a Confederate symbol. Who knew tigers were Confederates, but hey, like Commies you just never know. I don’t doubt that the new mascot will be the snowflake.

Still, there are outbreaks of sanity here and there. The small Kentucky town of Brandenburg has taken a Confederate statue banished from the University of Louisville. I am familiar with Brandenburg, it’s just off Fort Knox and hosts a lot of military retirees. This is not to say they’re necessarily pro-Confederate, just that as soldiers who have served themselves they appreciate the sacrifices made by the common soldiers of both sides in the conflict.

Courtney Hamilton, in London, calls the campaign against the statues “anti-racism, ISIS-style.” Yup.

And make no mistake about it, this is just the beginning. Ask not for who the tumbrils roll. They roll for you.

Have re-read this post and it seems awfully depressing, so I’ll lighten it up with an account by the inimitable Fred Reed, who describes as only he can what it was like to be a Marine “boot” in the (19)60s. Not Civil War related but funny, and includes an encounter with the greatly feared Carolina Wampus Cat.

{ 1 comment }


***

Check out the Siege of Petersburg Online for daily posts on battle accounts in newspaper articles, diary entries, letters and more!

What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

Want to read some interesting Civil War content from amateurs and pros alike? Check out the Top 10 Civil War Blogs and Top 10 Civil War Blogs: 11-20.

Pepperbox and Army sidearms

by Fred Ray May 29, 2017

Cap and Ball takes a look at the Pepperbox revolver. It’s generic term for a pistol that revolves the entire barrel assembly rather than just the cylinder, and was quite popular in the 1850s. At least a few were probably used in the Civil War, and they were certainly in use then by civilians. As […]

Read the full article →

Dispatches from the Battles of New Orleans

by Fred Ray May 14, 2017

This time it’s Jeff Davis. Same MO—heavy, militarized police presence with body armor and snipers on the rooftops. Everyone is masked and the logos and license plates covered, statue moved to “an undisclosed location.” Pat Gallagher, who lives in Jefferson Parish, said she decided to go out to the intersection because she is concerned about […]

Read the full article →

Short Takes

by Fred Ray May 3, 2017

Cap and Ball is at it again, this time with a P56 Enfield Short Rifle. This is the shorter version of the more common P53 Rifle Musket used extensively by North and South. The P56 (which also came in the slightly different P58 and P60 models) was a favorite of Confederate sharpshooters, both because of […]

Read the full article →

Dispatches From The War of Culinary Aggression

by Fred Ray April 26, 2017

Now they’ve banned grits and biscuits made the right way. “We could originally serve half whole grains but that changed in 2012 when we had to start serving 100 percent whole grains,” said Stephanie Dillard, the child nutrition director for Geneva County Schools in Alabama. That meant no more grits. “And grits are a staple […]

Read the full article →

The Night They Drove ‘Ol Dixie down

by Fred Ray April 25, 2017

The first of four Confederate monuments came down in New Orleans, but you have to wonder what the hey was going on. The minions of the Crescent City looked more like thieves in the night, with a very large touch of paranoia. Workers wore bullet-proof vests, helmets and facemasks as they went about the work, […]

Read the full article →