Civil War Book Acquisitions, November 2014, Part 3

by Brett Schulte on November 26, 2014 · 0 comments

The Chickamauga Campaign:A Mad Irregular Battle: From the Crossing of the Tennessee River Through the Second Day, August 22-September 19, 1863

TheChickamaugaCampaignVol1MadIrregularBattlePowellSavas2014 Civil War Book Acquisitions, November 2014, Part 3by David A. Powell

Savas Beatie

Format: Hardcover, 696 pages Price: $37.50 ISBN: 978-1-61121-174-0 eBook: 978-1-61121-175-7 On Sale: November 2014 26 maps, 40 images

TOCWOC’s Take: Even with all of the excellent Petersburg Campaign books coming out this year, this is probably my most eagerly anticipated Civil War book of 2014.  Dave Powell knows Chickamauga like an old friend, having studied the campaign in exhaustive detail for literally decades.  He’s walked the ground probably more times than he can remember, runs a fine blog which discusses the Chickamauga campaign, and hosts a yearly tour group of the battlefield every March.  He has already written two other books focusing on the campaign for Savas Beatie: The Maps of Chickamauga and Failure in the Saddle. The second volume is due to be released early next year, and a third volume, basically a book of appendices similar to Joe Harsh’s Sounding the Shallows, will follow. Check out the trailer here:

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The 2nd Maine Cavalry in the Civil War: A History and Roster

2ndMaineCavalryInTheCivilWarSmithMcFarland2014 Civil War Book Acquisitions, November 2014, Part 3by Ned Smith

McFarland and Company, Inc.

Print ISBN: 978-0-7864-7968-9 Ebook ISBN: 978-1-4766-1656-8 67 photos, 10 maps, appendices, notes, bibliography, index 240pp. softcover (7 x 10) 2014

TOCWOC’s Take: The 2nd Maine Cavalry, unlike its brother regiment the 1st Maine Cavalry, is not well known.  It didn’t fight in the Eastern Theater in Virginia.  It didn’t even fight in the Western Theater.  It fought its Civil War battles in Florida, Louisiana, and Alabama.  In addition, the regiment wasn’t even mustered in until later in the war.  Many of its men were veterans of infantry regiments raised earlier in the war.  Author Ned Smith looks to shed some light on a regiment whose exploits have been hiding away in the dark for 150 years.  He finds some interesting things, including that the regiment contained several Native Americans and an African American, and also a Medal of Honor winner.  Fans of the less well known theaters of the war will want to give this one a look.  The 2nd Maine Cavalry fought in the Red River Campaign, the Battle of Marianna in Florida, and at Mobile, Alabama in 1865, if you’re interested in some of its specific fights.

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The Battle of First Deep Bottom

FirstBattleOfDeepBottomPrice2014 Civil War Book Acquisitions, November 2014, Part 3by James S. Price

The History Press

ISBN : 978-1-60949-541-1 Page Extent : 160 pp. Trim Size : 6 x 9 Over 35 images Published : September 2014

TOCWOC’s Take: Another of the smaller, less well known battles at the Siege of Petersburg gets its day in the sun.  The First Battle of Deep Bottom occurred in the days leading up to the much more well known Battle of the Crater in late July 1864, during Grant’s Third Offensive against Petersburg.  This little campaign within a campaign initially had great goals.  Winfield S. Hancock was to push northwest towards Richmond, clearing a path so several of Phil Sheridan’s cavalry divisions could wreck the railroad north of Richmond.  It fizzled almost from the beginning.  Hancock intentionally took the lower pontoon bridge across the James River, putting Bailey’s Creek between him and the Confederates he was supposed to attack.  Though a strengthened skirmish line took four 20 pound Parrotts from a Confederate battery, not much else was accomplished.  Over the next two days, Hancock was strangely hesitant, and Sheridan, for once, seemed content to defer to his superior.  Grant used the fizzle to his advantage, however, making it look like reinforcements were being sent to fool Lee.  Ultimately, only three Confederate infantry divisions were present at Petersburg when the Crater assault occurred on July 30, so this diversion was at least successful.  The question remains, though, “How could three aggressive generals, Grant, Hancock, and Sheridan, be in charge of such a weak offensive effort as First Deep Bottom?”

I also reviewed the e-book version of this one earlier this Fall:

Author Jimmy Price wrote in his Preface “It is my hope that this book will be the starting point for all who wish to further their understanding of this important action and the tone it would set for the confrontations between Grant and Lee for the remainder of 1864.”  His hope is fulfilled with The Battle of First Deep Bottom.  Anyone interested in learning about the “other” operation which was going on prior to the Battle of the Crater during the Third Offensive against Petersburg will want to own this book.  Those looking for a “battle book” which focuses on new operations rather than rehashing Gettysburg for the 10,000th time will find it well written and entertaining.  It may give Gettysburg buffs new insight into Hancock, one of the heroes of that famous fight.  The author and publisher are to be commended for bringing to light not one but two obscure Petersburg Campaign battles with Price’s first two books.  Buy this book and Price’s earlier effort on New Market Heights.  Both are excellent introductions to the late war fighting around Richmond and Petersburg.

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Check out the Siege of Petersburg Online for daily posts on battle accounts in newspaper articles, diary entries, letters and more!

What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

Want to read some interesting Civil War content from amateurs and pros alike? Check out the Top 10 Civil War Blogs and Top 10 Civil War Blogs: 11-20.

Civil War Book Acquisitions, November 2014, Part 2

by Brett Schulte on November 18, 2014 · 0 comments

The Last Citadel: Petersburg, June 1864-April 1865 (150th Anniversary Edition)

TheLastCitadelPetersburgJun64Apr65Trudeau150thEdSavas Civil War Book Acquisitions, November 2014, Part 2by Noah Andre Trudeau

Savas Beatie

Format: Hardcover, 552 pages Price: $32.95 ISBN: 978-1-61121-212-9 eBook: 978-1-61121-213-6 On Sale: November 2014 6 x 9, 23 maps and 24 images

TOCWOC’s Take: Just in time for the 150th anniversary celebrations of the Siege of Petersburg comes this revised and expanded edition of Noah Andre Trudeau’s The Last Citadel, first published in 1991, this time around by Savas Beatie.  In the Preface to this edition, Trudeau clarifies what “revised and expanded” means.  First, he took an opportunity to update all of the maps in the book.  The first edition maps were done by Trudeau, and his experience with cartography over the years pays off here with his own revisions to the originals.  In addition, the author took note of all mentions of errors in book reviews and other places, also finding a few of his own along the way.  All known errors of this kind have been corrected in the 150th anniversary edition.  Lastly, Trudeau added several new pages of material and tweaked some of the existing material based on new items which changed his opinion, if ever so slightly, of several events during the Siege.  Needless to say, I’ll be reviewing this one here and at The Siege of Petersburg Online.

 

 

The Fighting Fifteenth Alabama Infantry: A Civil War History and Roster

TheFightingFifteenthAlabamaInfantryFaustMcFarland2014 Civil War Book Acquisitions, November 2014, Part 2by James P. Faust

McFarland & Company, Inc.

Print ISBN: 978-0-7864-9612-9 Ebook ISBN: 978-1-4766-1856-2 35 photos, appendices, notes, bibliography, index 228pp. softcover (7 x 10) 2014

TOCWOC’s Take: Here is another in a long line of regimentals McFarland has produced over the last ten years plus or so.  The book features 136 pages of text focusing on the history of the 15th Alabama.  The author does something interesting I can’t recall seeing before.  At various points in the narrative, he lists the men who can be proven to be present with the regiment based on their Compiled Service Reports, or CSRs.  He also tries to list the casualties by name, sorted by company.  Appendix A forms the second major portion of the book, listing service records by man in alphabetical order.  The author doesn’t look to have used many primary source accounts for the regiment, a bit of an omission.

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Check out the Siege of Petersburg Online for daily posts on battle accounts in newspaper articles, diary entries, letters and more!

What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

Want to read some interesting Civil War content from amateurs and pros alike? Check out the Top 10 Civil War Blogs and Top 10 Civil War Blogs: 11-20.

Was General Sherman Smeared?

by Fred Ray November 16, 2014

This being the 150th anniversary of Sherman’s March to the Sea, the venerable New York times has an article questioning just how bad Uncle Billy really was. Seems we have a new crop of historians who think that the Southern demonization of him was unwarranted, a sour grapes myth by the defeated Confederates perpetuated by […]

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Civil War Book Review: “The Devil’s to Pay”: John Buford at Gettysburg

by Brett Schulte November 10, 2014

Wittenberg, Eric J. “The Devil’s to Pay”: John Buford at Gettysburg: A History and Walking Tour. (Savas Beatie: October 2014). 288 pages, 79 images, 17 maps, 4 appendices, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN: 978-1-61121-208-2 $32.95 (Hardcover). Gettysburg has been done to death and then some.  The dead horse has been beaten so many times it’s disintegrating.  […]

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Civil War Book Acquisitions, November 2014

by Brett Schulte November 8, 2014

It’s been quite awhile since my last book acquisitions post, and now that the 150th anniversary of the Siege of Petersburg is about to go into winter quarters for a bit, posting at TOCWOC should again pick up.  Here are some recent arrivals along with my short comments on each: A Gunner in Lee’s Army: […]

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Sharpshooters on Jackson’s Flank March

by Fred Ray November 6, 2014

Good article on the Civil War Trust web site on Stonewall Jackson’s flank march at Chancellorsville by Robert K. Krick. Using new information Krick gives full credit to the vital role of Maj. Eugene Blackford’s Alabama sharpshooter battalion, and in general how Jackson and Robert Rodes used these new units. While Fitz Lee and his […]

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A Look at Some Period Firearms

by Fred Ray October 29, 2014

Very nice article by Bill Adams, one of the foremost CW-era firearms authorities, on the Kerr (pronounced “Carr”) rifle, second only to the fabled Whitworth as a sharpshooter’s rifle. Also info on modern attempts to make a shootable reproductions. (PDF file) And a compendium of videos from CapAndBall, a Hungarian web site (it’s in English […]

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