Sheridan’s Ride…The Other One

by Brett Schulte on August 11, 2014 · 0 comments

Mention “Sheridan’s Ride” to a Civil War buff and they’ll inevitably think of Sheridan furiously riding the ten miles back to his retreating army at the Battle of Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864, rallying his army and saving the day.  It’s what I thought of when I ran across a poem entitled “Sheridan’s Ride” on page 1, column 5 of the July 3o, 1864 issue of the New York Irish American.  But I was wrong.  And I realized I was wrong when I realized I was looking at a paper published almost three months prior to the Battle of Cedar Creek.  This Sheridan’s Ride was written about the Army of the Potomac’s great raid south towards Richmond in May 1864 which culminated in the death of J. E. B. Stuart at the Battle of Yellow Tavern on May 12, 1864. So, check out this OTHER version of Sheridan’s Ride.  It’s not quite got the same ring to it as painter Thomas Buchanan Read’s infinitely more well known poem of the same name, but I found it interesting enough to post.  Enjoy!

18640730NewYorkIrishAmericanP1C5SheridansRide Sheridans Ride...The Other One1

  1. “Sheridan’s Ride!” The Irish American (New York). July 30, 1864. Page 1, Column 5.

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As I Remember As I Remember: the Reminiscence of Lewis Cass White 102nd PA

As I Remember: A Civil War Veteran Reflects on the War and Its Aftermath
by Lewis Cass White
Joseph Scopin (editor, designer), forward by Benjamin Franklin Cooling

Hardcover: 184 pages
Publisher: Scopin Design (2014)
ISBN-10: 0615983480
ISBN-13: 978-0615983486

You never know what you’ll find in a basement or attic. That moldering pile of papers just might be important historical documents that shed new light on one of the most important incidents of the Civil War – the near-shooting of Abraham Lincoln at Fort Stevens on July 12, 1864. That was the situation Joseph Scopin found himself in when cleaning out the basement of an elderly relative. The moldy, waterlogged papers represented a lifetime’s collection of material about the battle by a Union veteran, Lewis Cass White of the 102nd Pennsylvania, one of the Sixth Corps regiments that had participated in the battle. Cass had been there on those two hot July days and after the war even bought a house on the old battlefield. He contacted many of the men who were also there, and their eyewitness accounts add immeasurably to our knowledge of that fateful day.

One of them was the man who was shot that day at Fort Stevens – Surgeon Cornelius C.V. Crawford, who was standing near President Lincoln on the parapet. Crawford’s account, and his diagram of the incident, differs considerably from many of the popular narratives. He was not standing next to Lincoln, but nevertheless the shot, which came from a grove to the east of the pike, did pass close to the president, who was standing behind the parapet. Crawford suffered a severe wound which put him out of action for the rest of the war and troubled him for the rest of his life.

Another man present was Lt. George Jewett, an artilleryman in the fort who was in a position to see and hear much of what went on. His account is also included, as are the reminiscences of several other men. One of the attractive features of the book is that editor Joseph Scopin has included both the transcription and the original documents in the book, so that a reader may compare the two.

After the war White became a government employee and somewhat of a local expert and activist of the Fort Stevens battlefield, which, as he always said was “a small event” with large consequences. What would have happened if Lincoln had been shot? If he had been killed or just suffered a disabling wound like Surgeon Crawford? The war – and history – might have taken a totally different turn.

White, who fought in 24 battles, served throughout the war until he lost a hand at Cedar Creek in the fall of 1864, and his included diary gives an excellent soldier’s eye view of the war in the East, from the Peninsular campaign through Sheridan’s Shenandoah campaign of 1864.

The book itself is handsomely designed, densely illustrated with contemporary illustrations by artists like Alfred Waud and Edwin Forbes, and produced in color by Joseph Scopin, an accomplished designer and journalist. The list price of $39.95 is a bit steep, but much cheaper than having to visit an archive to see these important documents. Unfortunately, there is no index.

Overall, highly recommended not just for the specialist in Fort Stevens but for anyone interested in a first hand account of the war by a Pennsylvania soldier.

Full disclosure: I received a review copy of this book.

UPDATE: Never let it be said that reading TOCWOC is not beneficial. Author/editor Joe Scopin has offered a 25% discount to TOCWOC readers who mention this review. Email him at jscopin@verizon.net for more details.

UPDATE 2: The email address for Joe Scopin was misspelled, this has been corrected.

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Check out the Siege of Petersburg Online for daily posts on battle accounts in newspaper articles, diary entries, letters and more!

What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

Want to read some interesting Civil War content from amateurs and pros alike? Check out the Top 10 Civil War Blogs and Top 10 Civil War Blogs: 11-20.

Civil War Book Review: The Battle of Allatoona Pass: Skirmish in Bartow County, Georgia

by Brett Schulte July 28, 2014

Butkovich, Brad. The Battle of Allatoona Pass: Civil War Skirmish in Bartow County, Georgia. (The History Press: June 2014). 192 pages, illustrations, 11 maps, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN: 978-1-62619-461-8 $19.99 (Paperback). Most Civil War buffs are familiar with the bookends of John Bell Hood’s tenure as Army of Tennessee commander at Atlanta and Franklin/Nashville.  Many, […]

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Civil War Book Review: Twenty-five Hours to Tragedy: The Battle of Spring Hill by Jamie Gillum

by Brett Schulte July 21, 2014

Gillum, Jamie. Twenty-five Hours to Tragedy: The Battle of Spring Hill and Operations on November 29, 1864 Precursor to the Battle of Franklin. (Jamie Gillum, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform: 2014). 504 pages, illustrations, 42 maps, appendices, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN: 978-1-4701-0681-2 $34.16 (Paperback). To understand the disastrous Confederate result at the Battle of Franklin, you […]

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The Sacking of “Baldy” Smith: July 19, 1864

by Brett Schulte July 19, 2014

Editor’s Note: This post was originally posted at The Siege of Petersburg Online and has been cross-posted here for the benefit of TOCWOC readers. *** July 19, 1864: William F. “Baldy” Smith is Relieved from Command of 18th Corps, AotJ Today marks the 150th anniversary of William F. “Baldy” Smith’s removal from command of the […]

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Civil War Book Review: The Petersburg Campaign Volume 2: The Western Front Battles September 1864-April 1865

by Brett Schulte July 18, 2014

Bearss, Ed. and Suderow, Bryce. The Petersburg Campaign Volume 2: The Western Front Battles, September 1864-April 1865. (Savas Beatie: March 2014). 600 pages, illustrations, 25 maps, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN: 978-0-7006-1959-7 $39.95 (Cloth). Picking up where Volume 1 left off, the award-winning The Petersburg Campaign Volume 2: The Western Front Battles, September 1864-April 1865 dusts […]

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Civil War Book Review: Guide to the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign

by Brett Schulte July 16, 2014

Bowery, Charles R. Jr. and Rafuse, Ethan S. Guide to the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign. (University Press of Kansas: May 2014). 420 pages, 36 illustrations, 47 maps, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN: 978-0-7006-1959-7 $39.95 (Cloth). Charles Bowery and Ethan Rafuse’s Guide to the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign is the next in a long line of U. S. Army War College […]

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