Number 1 (November 1997)

by Brett Schulte on March 15, 2009 · 2 comments

Web Site

North & South Magazine, Volume 1, Number 1 (November 1997)

North & South Magazine, Volume 1, Number 1 (November 1997)

96 Pages

Page 5
Editorial
by Keith Poulter

Page 6
Crossfire

Letters to the Editor

Page 8
Al Nofi’s Knapsack
by Al Nofi

Page 10
Black Rebels: Men of Color in the Confederate Army

Page 14
Could the Confederacy Have Won?

Author Shelby Foote was interviewed and asked if the Confederacy could have won the Civil War. In a somewhat surprising response, native Southerner Foote maintains that there was no way for the Confederacy to achieve victory.

Page 24
In Defense of Fighting Joe Hooker
by Stephen Sears

Stephen Sears, as the title above indicate, defends General Joseph Hooker. Sears maintains that Hooker was not a drunk, and that he never lost his nerve in battle. He goes on to say that Hooker made sure his men were well cared for and that Fighting Joe had the best combat record in the entire Army of the Potomac. Though the man was boastful and treated rivals rudely, says Sears, he should not be judged by his one defeat at Chancellorsville.

Page 37
Do You Know?

Page 38
Lafayette McLaws on Gettysburg

This article covers an 1885 letter written by General Lafayette McLaws detailing his views on the Battle of Gettysburg.

Page 42
The Chattahoochee River Line: An American Maginot
by William Scaife

Brigadier General Francis Asbury Shoup, Chief of Artillery for the Confederate Army of Tennessee, designed a system of fortifications along the Chattahoochee River in 1864 which were unique in the annals of the Civil War. Dubbed “Shoupades” in honor of their architect, these mutually-supporting little fortifications could have played a key role in stopping Sherman’s march on Atlanta, says Scaife. He even compares the Chattahoochee River Line to France’s World War II era Maginot Line. Editor Keith Poulter refutes this extreme importance, pointing out that a line of Shoupades able to cover the entire front would have had to extend 40 miles long, a defense line length for which there were not enough Confederates troops.

N&S Centerfold
Page 47: The Chattahoochee River Line Map
Page 48: Federal Order-of-Battle
Page 50: Confederate Order-of-Battle

Page 60
Briefings

Book Reviews

Page 63
The Man Who Taught The Army How to Fight
by Geoffrey Perret

Geoffrey Perret produces an article praising Ulysses S. Grant for his abilities as a soldier. He goes on to mention that the U.S. Army still teaches the strategy and tactics of Grant even today, and that the United States has won every war where “Grant’s rules” were heeded.

Page 80
Some Came Home: The Story of the 2nd Illinois Cavalry

The history of the 2nd Illinois Cavalry regiment is detailed.

Page 91
The Many Stories of the Stonewall Jackson Medal
by Frank Wheeler and Peter Bertran

The authors sort through the various tales told about the Stonewall Jackson medal, commissioned in France in 1863 shortly after the general’s death. The medal has ties to the Marquis de Lafayette, grandson of General Lafayette.

Page 96
Classified Ads


***

Check out the Siege of Petersburg Online for daily posts on battle accounts in newspaper articles, diary entries, letters and more!

What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

Want to read some interesting Civil War content from amateurs and pros alike? Check out the Top 10 Civil War Blogs and Top 10 Civil War Blogs: 11-20.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Marty March 28, 2010 at 9:09 am

Hello I looking to get a copy of this Issue of North & South Vol. 1 No. 1 I am very interested in Page 42
The Chattahoochee River Line: An American Maginot
by William Scaife

Brigadier General Francis Asbury Shoup, Chief of Artillery for the Confederate Army of Tennessee, designed a system of fortifications along the Chattahoochee River in 1864 which were unique in the annals of the Civil War. Dubbed “Shoupades” in honor of their architect, these mutually-supporting little fortifications could have played a key role in stopping Sherman’s march on Atlanta, says Scaife. He even compares the Chattahoochee River Line to France’s World War II era Maginot Line. Editor Keith Poulter refutes this extreme importance, pointing out that a line of Shoupades able to cover the entire front would have had to extend 40 miles long, a defense line length for which there were not enough Confederates troops.

N&S Centerfold
Page 47: The Chattahoochee River Line Map
Page 48: Federal Order-of-Battle
Page 50: Confederate Order-of-Battle

Reply

admin March 28, 2010 at 10:42 am

Marty,

I do not have extra copies available. Your best bet is to keep an eye out for this eBay or similar used book sites. You might also try emailing or mailing North & South to see if they can point you to some extra back issues.

Brett

Reply

Leave a Comment