The Night They Drove ‘Ol Dixie down

by Fred Ray on April 25, 2017 · 1 comment

The first of four Confederate monuments came down in New Orleans, but you have to wonder what the hey was going on. The minions of the Crescent City looked more like thieves in the night, with a very large touch of paranoia.

Workers wore bullet-proof vests, helmets and facemasks as they went about the work, which involved lifting sections of the obelisk off the statue piece by piece. The logos on their trucks and equipment was covered in cardboard and the license plates on the vehicles had been removed. One man opposed to removing the monuments told others in his group “we’ll find out who they are.”

At one point, city officials called to criticize a TV station for taking video that they said was zoomed in too close and could reveal the workers’ identities.

Wow.

For a troubled city that relies heavily in tourism and its history, this does not seem to be such great publicity.

Who’s next? Jackson?


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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Josh Liller May 3, 2017 at 11:25 pm

If the workers were being threatened with violence no wonder they were taking seemingly-paranoid protective measures.

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