Interview With Civil War Preservation Trust President Jim Lighthizer at This Mighty Scourge

by Brett Schulte on June 26, 2009 · 1 comment

Mike Noirot recently interviewed Civil War Preservation Trust President Jim Lighthizer at his Civil War blog This Mighty Scourge.  This isn’t any ordinary blog interview, however.  Mike did an audio interview with Mr. Lighthizer, and it is broken down into eight parts in the usual mp3 format.  Make sure you tell others interested about Civil War battlefield preservation about the CWPT in general and this interview in particular.  While you are at it, don’t miss the newly redesigned CWPT website.  Save our history!

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Peter Dalton April 24, 2017 at 7:49 am

I wanted to check-in with you with regard to the battlefield at Buckton Station, Near Front Royal, Va. Currently there are no markers and none of the battlefield has been preserved. The Buckton Station Farm is currently for sale for $395,000, and though it is only a small part of the battlefield, it is prime battlefield land. The purchase of the property would be a great start at preservation.

As you know the fight at Buckton Station occurred on May 23, 1862, and involved three Union infantry companies and Colonel Turner Ashby’s and Lt. Col. Flournoy’s Virginia cavalry. Ashby had ridden to the Union outpost at Buckton Depot where he made a mounted assault, which cost him several of his best officers. Ashby cut the telegraph lines, severing communication between the main Union army at Strasburg and the force at Front Royal. Ashby then divided the cavalry and sent Flournoy’s regiment east to Front Royal to threaten Kenly’s rear. Ashby remained at Buckton Depot to prevent Banks reinforcements from being sent to Front Royal.

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